Archive for the ‘Artist Management’ Category

Samia

Posted on: June 23rd, 2021 by founder No Comments

Samia’s 2020 debut album, The Baby, was a testament to her impressive vocal might, irresistible tunefulness and vulnerable lyricism, both clever and illuminating in equal measure. Drawing widespread acclaim from Pitchfork, Stereogum, NPR, NME, The Sunday Times, and others, the LP more than delivered following the promise of early singles like 2018’s “Django” and 2019’s “Ode to Artifice.” After emerging as one of the most exciting up-and-comers in indie rock, Samia released a companion album this past January titled The Baby Reimagined, a collection of covers and remixes featuring Bartees Strange, Anjimile, Field Medic, Palehound, former tourmate Donna Missal, and more. 

Samia spent much of 2020 in self-reflection, and she also made various life changes that left her feeling more earnest and centered. “I got back into therapy and started thinking about boundaries, I moved to Nashville, I did yoga sometimes,” she says. During this time, she wrote a handful of songs that make up Scout, a new EP that’s out everywhere now. “These were pretty much the only four songs that came naturally during this time, but I think they really mirror my emotional experience this past year,” Samia says.

While The Baby leaned more on self-deprecating humor, Scout was born out of a need to “honor feeling secure in what [she] had to say.” Lead track “As You Are” revels in the preciousness of unconditional love (“When somebody loves you / They take you as you are,” she belts in the chorus) and floats delicately with graceful vocals and steady percussion. Staticky guitar number “Show Up” is an acknowledgment of personal growth, and its unwavering desire for wholesome joy really tugs at the heartstrings (“Nothing could ever stop / my ass from showing up / to sing another song for the people I love”). The EP is packed with reverence for life’s ups and downs, but more than anything, it’s an ode to loved ones.

The compassionate glow of this EP partially stems from her new Nashville surroundings, as well as her recent experiences “feeling genuinely loved, making new friends, and holding onto old friendships.” There’s a palpable intimacy to these recordings, whether it’s the voicemail murmurs of “As You Are,” the heart-on-your-sleeve lyrics or the piano twinkles throughout. It’s reminiscent of that reassuring exhale in the mirror after an imperfect yet fulfilling day. As Samia puts it, Scout isThe Baby‘s slightly older sister letting her know that everything is gonna be alright.”

The EP title is a nickname of Samia’s, and it’s a fitting nod to the record’s benevolence. “My partner calls me Scout,” she explains. “It’s just a word that implies bravery to me. I always picture a little girl with a sash and badges basking in her autonomy selling Samoas.” Whether you’re a girl scout trying to gain confidence or an adult who needs reminders of our inability to make everyone happy (“Elephant”) or the untold power of being there for someone (“The Promise”), this EP is an unashamed loving nudge.

Simone

Posted on: February 12th, 2021 by founder No Comments

“I’m always writing,” says Simone. “It’s therapeutic for me, like a muscle I need to exercise every day.”

 

Such devotion to craft helps explain the breakout 16-year-old star’s prolific output over the past year, as well as the remarkable growth showcased on her addictive new EP, Love Lessons. Written and recorded entirely during quarantine, the collection is a pure rush of dopamine fueled by raw, vulnerable performances and deep, insightful lyrics. Simone writes with a cinematic eye here, capturing the rough edges of modern relationships in vivid detail, and the EP’s arrangements are sonically rich to match, mixing radio-ready pop hooks with indie rock grit and singer/songwriter intimacy. The result is a collection that lands somewhere between Carly Rae Jepsen and Phoebe Bridgers, a buoyant, brilliant batch of earworms exploring the rise and fall of teenage romance in all its exhilarating, heartbreaking transience.

 

Born and raised in New York City, Simone first fell in love with Broadway as a youngster. By the age of ten, she’d already appeared in a slew of musicals, and by the time she hit middle school, she was writing her own songs and performing regularly in bars and clubs all over the city. It was at one of those early performances that Simone caught the attention of a New York-based producer, and soon she found herself recording in a proper studio and making major waves across Spotify and social media. With a mix of mesmerizing performance clips and down-to-earth, straight-to-camera videos documenting daily life, she quickly went viral on TikTok, racking up millions of likes from fans around the world who could relate to both her unabashed ambition and dry, self-deprecating sense of humor.

Ross Copperman

Posted on: February 12th, 2021 by founder No Comments

Francis Karel

Posted on: February 9th, 2021 by founder No Comments

It only takes a few seconds to fall in love with Francis Karel. Need proof? Check out any of the unassuming singer/songwriter’s countless Omegle reaction videos, in which he reduces unsuspecting strangers to instant tears with just his mesmerizing voice and soulful guitar. Recorded alone at home, Karel’s jaw-dropping, impromptu performances have taken the internet by storm over the past year, earning him more than 1.2 million followers on TikTok and high-profile Instagram fans like Benny Blanco, Meghan Trainor, Zedd, and Bebe Rexha. And while those videos certainly make for a great introduction, they’re just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the prolific 22-year-old’s otherworldly talents.

 

Born and raised in Jakarta, Karel’s unlikely path began while working backstage at an Indonesian music festival, where he accidentally spilled coffee in front of a top record executive. Despite the awkward introduction, the two hit it off, and the next thing Karel knew, he was saying goodbye to everyone and everything he’d ever known, flying halfway around the world on a terrifying but exhilarating journey toward a new life in America. Now based full-time in LA, Karel’s set to build on his viral success with his debut studio recordings, which hint at everything from Bruno Mars and BTS to Ed Sheeran to Jon Bellion as they showcase both his extraordinary vocal talent and charismatic charm.

 

So go ahead and press play on Francis Karel. He may be new, but all he needs is an instant to win your heart.

Laufey

Posted on: January 27th, 2021 by founder No Comments

Half Chinese and half Icelandic, Laufey spent much of her childhood traveling between Reykjavík and Washington, DC, where she learned to speak English with barely a trace of an accent. Inspired in part by her mother, a classical violinist, she took up piano and cello early on, but it was her father’s collection of Ella Fitzgerald and Billie Holiday albums that spoke to her on a deeper level.“I’m definitely very influenced by composers like Ravel and Chopin,”Laufey explains,“but when I discovered the Great American Songbook and the music of George Gershwin and Richard Rodgers, it felt like this middle ground between jazz and classical that suited me perfectly.”Laufey dove into the music headfirst, captivated by the lush arrangements and dreamy vocals, and by her teenage years, she was already turning heads with a mesmerizing style that belied her young age. After landing a prestigious Presidential Scholarship to the Berklee College of Music, Laufey moved to Boston, where she began writing her own songs blending sophisticated jazz melodies and slow-burning R&B grooves. Unable to tour due to the COVID-19 pandemic, she began performing a mix of originals and vintage classics on Instagram and TikTok, and within a year, she would find herself racking up millions of likes, topping the Icelandic radio charts with her debut single,“Street By Street,”and earning support from Billie Eilish and Willow Smith. Laufey will release her debut EP,Typical of Me, later this year.

mazie

Posted on: December 8th, 2020 by founder No Comments

“There’s something really dark and existential about my songs,” says mazie, “but at the same time, they’re all wrapped up in this bright, playful, sugar coating. I’m always trying to walk that line.”

Indeed, mazie’s music is built on contradictions and double negatives, pairing bleak, fatalistic lyrics with shiny, alt-pop arrangements as infectious as they are unpredictable. Mixing modern malaise with vintage psychedelia, her writing exudes a childlike innocence, but with an eerie, off-kilter twist, like watching old home movies through a funhouse mirror. There’s nostalgia in her hypnotic performances, to be sure, but it always comes laced with dread, with an impending sense of doom fueled by a world in ever-deepening crisis. And so mazie smiles and laughs as she steps into the abyss, because if the world’s about to end, why not at least have a little fun with it?

“So much of what I consume on a daily basis is really heavy political content,” says mazie, who devotes much of her time outside of music to social activism. “I think anyone who knows me would say that I’m a pretty happy person, though, so I end up with this music that sounds very upbeat and whimsical even though it’s about loneliness or isolation or anxiety.”

Born in Albany, Georgia and raised outside Baltimore, mazie fell in love with singing at an early age and spent most of her childhood studying classical and jazz vocals. By the time she hit her teenage years, she was writing her own music and recording it with her neighbor, Elie Rizk, who was teaching himself to engineer and produce in his basement studio. The two were deliberate about their search for a sound, though, and spent years experimenting and collaborating before they landed on “no friends,” mazie’s breakout 2020 debut. Clocking in at less than two minutes, the utterly addictive single exploded online, earning widespread acclaim and quickly racking up millions of streams.

“We were in total shock,” says mazie. “That song really defined the project for us, and when it started going crazy, everything just accelerated.”

In the months to come, the pair would follow it up with two more singles, the lilting “i think i wanna be alone” and trippy “sippy cup,” both of which arrived to similarly rapturous responses. Like “no friends,” the tracks were deceptively cheerful, full of jaunty melodies and earworm hooks and accompanied by DIY artwork and videos that resembled outtakes from some deranged children’s TV show.

“Leaving childhood is tough,” says mazie, who recently relocated to LA. “You’ve got to come to terms with the fact that life is hard, that your family isn’t perfect, that the world isn’t such a good place after all. I wanted to find ways for the music and the visuals to reflect that uneasy transition into adulthood, that feeling of growing up in the midst of all this chaos.”

And while mazie may be a stage name, it’s certainly not a character. The emotions behind the songs, the highs and lows and pain and hope and sadness and joy, they’re as real as can be, even when they all happen at the exact same time.

“When I’m writing a song, I’m kind of putting my feelings under a microscope,” mazie explains. “I’m zooming in and blowing them up and exaggerating them to their extremes. It’s a way of not taking myself too seriously, of being able to laugh at all these conflicting things I’m feeling once.”

Happy and sad, bitter and sweet, vulnerable and guarded, mazie is full of contradictions, and that’s just the way she likes it.

COIN

Posted on: September 12th, 2019 by founder No Comments

Since the arrival of their 2016 breakthrough single “Talk Too Much,” COIN have continually turned out sublimely catchy alt-pop, equally built on effervescent hooks and an understated complexity. With that dynamic earning them a passionate following, the Nashville-based trio have spent much of the past few years bringing their sing-along-heavy live set to frenzied crowds all across the globe. Now at work on their third full-length effort, COIN are embracing their pop instincts more fully than ever, dreaming up their most sonically adventurous yet emotionally direct batch of songs to date.

The follow-up to 2017’s How Will You Know if You Never Try, COIN’s forthcoming album finds the band letting go of a certain self-imposed limitation on their sound. “The whole point behind this album was to not overthink anything as we were putting the songs together,” says Lawrence. “There have been moments in the past where a sample or a drum sound or a keyboard riff might not make the song because we didn’t feel like it was inherently COIN. This time, if something felt good, then we just went for it. We never felt the need to get too precious about anything.”

In bringing the new album to life, COIN collaborated with co-writers/producers like Foster the People frontman Mark Foster and keyboardist Isom Innis. Still, much of the album was sparked from Lawrence’s solo writing and production sessions, often carried out spontaneously in bedrooms or green rooms or friends’ home studios. Not only essential in shaping Lawrence’s unflinchingly honest explorations of love and anxiety and emotional commitment, that more intimate approach helped to magnify COIN’s newly heightened sense of creative freedom.

In the making of their more recent single “I Want It All,” for instance, COIN took a particularly offbeat burst of inspiration — the infectiously shuffling rhythm to Gary Glitter’s “Rock & Roll Part 2” — and conjured up a groove-driven anthem that turns gloriously epic in its final moments. And in his lyrics, Lawrence offers up a confession of longing for complete devotion in a relationship, delivering each line with a subtle self-assurance that echoes the ease of the writing process. “We had that beat and I started singing and the words just came right out of me — it was the wildest experience, it felt so easy I almost couldn’t believe it,” Lawrence recalls.

Another reflection on love and presence, “Simple Romance” unfolds as a minimalist yet dance-ready serenade, infused with throbbing beats and shimmering textures and Lawrence’s lithe falsetto. “That song’s about the complexity of relationships and how much effort it really takes, which I think is something not all of us consider when we first endeavor into something romantically,” Lawrence points out.

Meanwhile, on “Cemetery,” COIN brilliantly contrast their bright melodies and up-tempo rhythms with darkly charged lyrics (“Never made time for the family/But he is the richest man in the cemetery”). A meditation on the emotional cost of self-absorption, the track examines what Lawrence refers to as becoming “so caught up in the future and what’s next in my life, I lose track of what’s right in front of me.” “We’ve started playing that one live, and it’s been amazing to see how much it connects with people,” he adds. “Even though it sounds so happy-go-lucky, it’s meant to be a catalyst for change, and help people to recognize what really matters in life.”

With his delicately nuanced narrative voice, Lawrence first immersed himself in songwriting as a kid in West Virginia. “When I was around 12 I started writing all these super-sad songs — 12-year-old me was so tortured,” he laughs. As he refined his songcraft over the years — thanks partly to the influence of singer/songwriters like Paul Simon—Lawrence first crossed paths with Memmel outside a show he attended on a whim at age 17. “I went by myself and ended up talking to these two guys, and one of them told me how he went to Belmont University,” remembers Lawrence, who was then enrolled at a small West Virginia college. “A year and a half later I worked up the nerve to transfer to Belmont, and the first day of music theory class I sat right next to that guy from the show.” When the two headed to Lawrence’s dorm to attempt to write a song together, Lawrence brought out his Casio keyboard and played Memmel a sketch of what would become the first-ever COIN song (“Oh No,” a cut from their 2012 EP Saturdays). With Winnen soon added to the lineup, the trio began recording and booking shows around town, quickly drawing a loyal fanbase and later landing a deal with Columbia Records.

Produced by Grammy Award-winner Jay Joyce (The Head and the Heart, FIDLAR, Cage the Elephant), COIN’s self-titled debut arrived in June 2015 and featured the irresistibly wistful single “Run” — a track that emerged as the fifth-most-spun song of the year on Sirius XM radio’s Alt Nation. In April 2017 COIN put out How Will You Know if You Never Try, and soon saw lead single “Talk Too Much” hit the top ten on Billboard’s US Alternative Songs chart. Now at over 63 million streams on Spotify, “Talk Too Much” also earned lavish praise from outlets like Entertainment Weekly, who hailed the track as a “prime example of just how sweet indie alt-pop can sound when it’s done right.”

As part of their nonstop touring schedule in recent years, COIN have taken their unforgettable and intensely communal live performance to major festivals like Lollapalooza, Bonnaroo Reading & Leeds and Firefly, in addition to touring with such acts as The 1975 and Young the Giant. In every show, COIN aim to remove the barrier between band and audience, ultimately creating a nearly familial connection with the crowd. “We’ve grown so much over the past few years, it’s been a work-in-progress to keep the feeling of a very home-style show,” Lawrence notes. “Every time we play, we want everyone to know that this is a safe place, where no one’s judging you for how you think or how you act. I grew up in church, and sometimes when we’re up there and they’re all singing back to us, it almost feels like church to me. It’s a very special thing for all of us to feel that close to the crowd.”

As they gear up for the release of their third album, COIN hope to deepen that closeness, a mission that traces back to their increasingly self-reliant and uncompromising approach to their artistry. “In my music and in my relationships, I’ve found that worrying about being accepted by everybody really doesn’t do any good,” says Lawrence. “You end up making something or living in a way that isn’t true to yourself, and because of that, it doesn’t feel true to other people either. So there’s really no point in having that anxiety — things might not be perfect every step of the way, but you’ve got to do what feels right and know that it’s the only real way to go.”

Wilder Woods

Posted on: May 29th, 2019 by founder No Comments

Wilder Woods’ self-titled debut is a mystifying concoction of classic soul, infectious R&B, and modern alt pop that pairs intimate, introspective lyricism with a self-assured swagger and sophistication. Fueled by stop-you-in-your-tracks vocals, the album explores patience, forgiveness, and self-love in a world that’s woefully short on all three. From the funk infused Marvin Gaye beat down on the opening track, to the haunting ballads echoing the pain of a Michael Kiwanuka, Wilder Woods is a collection of tunes that are as introspective as they are care free, and as weathered as they are hopeful.

Known to many as the frontman and co-founder of GRAMMY® Award-nominated, chart-topping band NEEDTOBREATHE, Wilder Woods is a new chapter in Bear Rinehart’s storied career. WILDER WOODS’ debut album is now set to arrive everywhere on August 9th and features the already released “Sure Ain’t” & “Someday Soon.” WILDER WOODS is the sound of a veteran songwriter confidently breaking new ground, blazing his own distinctive trail through uncharted territory with comfort and style. WILDER WOODS uncovers a new side of Bear Rinehart, one that he’s more than ready to share. Wilder Woods will celebrate the release of his debut LP by embarking on a full North American headline Fall tour, kicking off September 5th at Mod Club in Toronto, ON. For more information visit iamwilderwoods.com.

Gabe Simon

Posted on: January 23rd, 2019 by founder

Gabe Simon is a writer, producer and multi-instrumentalist based in Nashville that has produced and/or written songs for Dua Lipa, Lana Del Rey, Grandson, American Authors, Jai Wolf, Whethan, mxmtoon, COIN and many more. He has forthcoming productions/compositions with Maroon5, Hailee Steinfeld, Rag N Bone Man, The Wombats, Arlie, Griffyn and Lovely The Band. Gabe also has a project called Mr. Gabriel and is featured on the Jai Wolf singles “Starlight” and “Lose My Mind” and the Whethan’s “Ocean Energy.” Mr. Gabriel releases have been synced in Flim/TV over 50 times. Gabe began his career while in college, writing for and fronting the indie-rock band Kopecky (fka Kopecky Family Band). The band racked up critical acclaim as well as AAA and Alternative Radio success.

Monica Martin

Posted on: October 25th, 2018 by founder No Comments

Monica Martin is a Chicago-born singer-songwriter who grew up in rural Wisconsin, mostly waiting for Billie Holiday videos to load on back-country dial-up or making trips in a busted Geo Metro to watch punk shows in Milwaukee. Trained as a hairdresser, she didn’t have musical plans beyond joke riffing harmonies over the radio. After being coaxed by her best friend Matt, she started to sing in public and on friends’ records, which all led to her writing her own songs. She fronted experimental-folk-pop sextet, PHOX, formed in Madison, Wisconsin in 2012. PHOX released an eponymous album, played big festivals, national TV shows, and flew overseas to play shows far away from home. PHOX went on indefinite hiatus in 2017, and Monica moved to LA because “Wisconsin is cold as f*ck”. She found herself a periwinkle casita and is feeling freer than ever in the city of misfits. She’s presently at work unpacking her mental confusions by cataloging/celebrating the fuckery of her ex-es (and herself) in lowkey pop songs with soul whispers, some golden-era hollywood dramatics, and psychedelic flickers courtesy of a theremin. Monica is still figuring out who she is, but quite happy to share her cautionary tales: “I made hundreds of mistakes so you don’t have to.”

Early last year, Monica started recording some of the songs she’s been writing since the move. She has released the first one, titled, “Cruel.”

“You can equip your lover with the truth, but they might still lie to themselves,” she says on the song, ”there is a point where, if you know they aren’t going to manage their expectations as a grown ass person, you’re cruel to not call the incompatibility and leave… “